Dopeness

A gallery of the Dopest Spoken/Slam videos to be found

Dopeness: Shady CXVPHER

Though Dopeness has focused on Spoken Word, it is much more a celebration of lyricism.  As such, Dopeness will be expanding into Cypher territory.  What better cypher to start with than the Shady CXVPHER.

If you haven’t seen this yet, you’ve missed out on some of the best rappers spitting bar after bar after bar.  This is not for the faint of lyrical heart.  Some of these lines are just crazy.

Starting with King Crooked, you immediate know that this cypher is not just quality, but raw and honest.  When Joe Budden spits, you feel it.  When YelaWolf spits, you believe it.  Joell Ortiz brings bars for days.  Finally, closing with Royce da 5’9″ and Eminem, himself, this cypher is a masterpiece of wit and wordplay.

Dopeness: Separate From Separation -Will & Jordan Miller

Group pieces are always fun.  Your typical group piece takes ample time and practice to create a single profound and succinct message.  The message touched on by Separate From Separation is one of love and unity.

The video, itself, builds a tone with soft background music, and is powerful in its minimalist nature. Despite, how little there is going on in the video, the separation of the speakers is striking and obvious.  This a dope piece, but even doper video.

Dopeness: Negro – Christian Richardson

“I’m here to strike fear into a utopia”.

Christian Richardson has tapped into the root of the Spoken Word movement with this piece, ‘Negro‘.  Loud, passionate, and revolutionary, Richardson holds nothing back in his authentic diatribe and look into his culture.  Short and sweet, this piece is a spark waiting to light a greater fire to come.

Dopeness: Ghetto – Paulie Lipman

This piece is a ‘knowledge-dropper’.  I made up that word, but the idea remains.

Paulie Lipman is more than just entertaining in this piece.  The piece is made to teach.  This piece is an analysis of the words we use, and our collective amnesia of the meaning that lies behind them.  The focus of this piece is on the word, “Ghetto”, but the lesson to be gained is so much more expansive.

Dopeness : The Top Secret Recipe For Aunt Phyliss’ Fried Chicken – Michael Harriot

The recipe for a great Spoken Word poem:

A tablespoon of witty word play.

Two cups of Hard-hitting imagery.

Three teaspoons of thought-provoking.

A pinch of dramatic performance.

First, mix your wordplay, performance, and imagery until a compelling flow is created.

Then, when the crowd is connected to the piece, sneak in your teaspoons of thought-provoking.

Mix well, bake beneath a lime-light for 3 minutes.

Voila.



“The Top Secret Recipe For Aunt Phyliss’ Fried Chicken.”  Poignant in it’s deception of the audience’s expectations, this poem is great for many reasons.  This classic will grab hold of your attention, and may not let go.

What did you like about this piece? Do you want to see more like it?  Let us know in a comment below.

Dopeness : Capoeira – Noah St. John

This is a spoken word performance by Noah St. John. One of my friends put me on to this a few weeks ago, and it just woke me up creatively.

Noah speaks about practicing the Brazilian art of Capoeira, which was born during a time of African slavery. Capoeira incorporates songs, flexible acrobatics, and is played almost like a game. Noah displays all of those elements in his performance.  He sets aside the mic stand from the beginning and makes use of the entire floor space. He admits that this art form is not from his culture, but that he is borrowing it in order to understand and share in the experience.

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Dopeness : Burundi – Saul Williams

Saul Williams is little else than an innovator in the Spoken Word community.  With movie and broadways credits, meaningful written word, as well as multiple albums worthy of acclaim, Saul Williams has done it all.

With a new album on the horizon, MartyrLoserKing, Saul has officially released his newest track, Burundi.  Burundi is a treasure trove of lyrical flair examining technology, activism, and the current social unrest in Burundi/ Central Africa.

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Dopeness : Dear Young Men of Color

Fong Tran has something special.

Yes, he is a great lyricist with a mastered cadence, but what makes him special is his perspective.  Too often I find that subject matters regarding race appear relegated to a black/white binary.  Race is much larger than white and black, and Tran’s widened perspective of a long established dilemma feels fresh.  Tran performance is making several powerful statements that not only make the piece Dope, but timely.   (more…)